Carderock Area Report

As of March 24, there’s still not much blooming yet. Harbinger of spring is in full bloom, or even slightly past, and round-lobed hepatica (pictured) and lyre-leaved rock cress seem to be at their peaks. Spring beauties are blooming but not en masse. Other native plants seen just starting to open:

  • Virginia bluebells
  • leatherwood
  • cut-leaved toothwort
  • star chickweed
  • wild blue phlox
  • common blue violet
  • spicebush

Golden ragwort is starting, too, well downstream of the Carderock area. Dutchman’s breeches and trout lily foliage is now visible through the leaf litter.

Until the show really gets going I’ll keep posting about Anza-Borrego.

5 thoughts on “Carderock Area Report

  1. Thanks for the Carderock report; very helpful to me now that I live further away and have to make more effort to get there. I saw three white-flowered hepatica plants blooming at Carderock almost a month ago but I guess everything stalled since then. Went out today in NoVa and only saw bloodroot and a few spring beauties. Strange year so far.

  2. What’s the bloodroot and twin leaf status around Carderock/Billy Goat B/Marsden? Hope I didn’t miss twin leaf again this year. Really enjoy the blog; glad you continue to publish.

  3. Thanks, and I’m glad you continue to read! It *has* been a strange year; I think you’re right, things stalled, and now they’re taking awhile to get going again. I have yet to see bloodroot in that area, though I’ve been looking, and twinleaf hasn’t emerged yet. It usually blooms early to mid April; have a look here for data from the past few years: https://elizabethswildflowerblog.com/list-of-native-flowering-plants/jeffersonia-diphylla/.

    I’ll be sure to post about both when (if) I see them.

    • Inspired by your report, I went up there yesterday. Blooming at the nice toad-shade patch: toad-shade, Dutchman’s breeches, lots of trout lilies, rue anemone, plus what you listed. Upstream – twin leaf is 6 inches tall and has buds ready to open. One bloodroot at Marsden. More were blooming Feb. 28 — maybe the cold got them.

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