On the Asclepias Buffet

20150623-20150623-_DSC0134The milkweeds sure do attract visitors.  Pleased to discover a very small stand of swamp milkweed (Asclepias incarnata) in an easily accessible area, I decided to stay awhile to see who came by. Here are some of the insects I saw on it.

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This is a pearl crescent butterfly, Phyciodes tharos, a member of the brushfoot family (Nymphalidae).  20150623-20150623-_DSC0105

See the blurry orange thing in the foreground?

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That’s an assassin bug (species unknown, family Reduviidae). They sometimes hide in flowers, but more often actively hunt their prey*.  They use their rostrums to inject prey with salvia, which then liquefies the victim’s insides so that the bug can suck them out.

I have a sudden, strange urge to watch Starship Troopers again.

In less gruesome news, the milkweeds were also attracting the bees.

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I have no way to identify the species of this bumblebee (family Bombidae).

[edited to add: see comments]

*Encyclopedia of Life

More Seeds

Milkweed (Asclepias).  Didn’t see the plant in flower, so I can’t say which species.  October 28, Shenandoah National Park, parking lot at Riprap Hollow trailhead.

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closeup of seeds

 

 

 

 

 

 

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unripe pods not quite ready

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fly!  be free!

 

 

 

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I just love how they form little balloons as they’re getting ready to go…

 

 

 

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…and embrace the sky